Accidents Caused By Distracted Drivers

a distracted driverDistracted driving is the process in which a driver takes their attention away from driving in order to perform another activity. According to the Alberta Ministry of Transportation distracted drivers are three times more likely to be involved in a crash than attentive drivers.

Also known as careless or inattentive driving, there are a number of activities that can distract driving including eating, the use of a cell phone, or the use of a navigational system. The use of a handheld device is prohibited in Ontario, however, motorists often still take the risk of being ticketed or involved in a car crash.

Have you or someone you love been involved in an accident that was caused by a distracted driver?

Have you considered exploring your legal options to help recover compensation for any losses that you may have experienced from that accident?

At the law offices of Greg Monforton & Partners, our lawyers have extensive knowledge of the distracted driver laws in Ontario and can help to fight for the justice that you deserve.

For a free review of your traffic incident, click "here" to reach us online or call (866) 320-4770.

Common Driver Distractions

The Canadian Automobile Association notes that drivers can have in-vehicle and outside-vehicle distractions meaning that they can be diverted by a variety of factors.

Some common in-vehicle distractions include:

  • Passengers
  • Cellphones
  • Smoking
  • Personal Grooming
  • Eating and Drinking
  • Adjusting Vehicle Controls
  • Navigational Systems or Looking for Directions
  • Bright lights from oncoming traffic

Day dreaming is another common distraction that can cause accidents as drivers often find themselves lost in thought while behind the wheel.

Further distractions found outside of the vehicle include:

  • Pedestrians
  • Road Construction
  • Street Noise
  • Scenery
  • Car Collision Sites

Rubbernecking is a common interruption as motorists will often try to get a glimpse of an accident and in some cases even take photos using their mobile devices.

Avoiding Distracted Driving

Car collisions caused by distracted driving are completely avoidable if a motorist takes the time to rid themselves of distractions before they begin driving.

Some easy ways to keep from being distracted include:

  • Putting away all handheld devices while driving
  • Review all directions before driving
  • If lost, pull over to a safe area to review your directions
  • Allow for additional driving time
  • Pre-set all your climate and radio controls ahead of time
  • Do not groom yourself while driving
  • Avoid eating or drinking in the car
  • Avoid being distracted by your passengers

If a driver is ever distracted by their passengers they may also wish to pull over to a safe location, particularly if parents need to console infants and young children.

Contact an Ontario Distracted Driving Accident Lawyer

If you or a loved one was injured in an accident by a distracted driver, our personal injury lawyers believe the negligent party should be held responsible for their actions. Distracted driving accidents happen because others were being careless or reckless and did not worry about the danger they were putting their fellow motorists in.

At Greg Monforton and Partners, we believe in protecting the right of the injured and are dedicated to helping each and every one of them personally. Since 1987 we have been providing comprehensive legal counsel to personal injury victims throughout Windsor and Essex County. We also proudly serve the following areas:

  • Windsor
  • London
  • Sarnia
  • Chatham-Kent
  • Leamington
  • Kitchener
  • Scarborough
  • Toronto

and further surrounding cities.

Contact us toll-free at (866) 320-4770 for a free, no-obligation evaluation of your claim by one of our knowledgeable accident lawyers.

You may also contact us online by simply filling out the FREE CASE REVIEW form at the top right hand corner if this page its completely confidential.

At Greg Monforton & Partners, we only get paid when a recovery is made on your behalf.